DeCamara & Ritchie on Wentz vs. Foles

Joe DeCamara & Jon Ritchie
May 21, 2020 - 9:34 am
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Today is Carson Wentz vs. Nick Foles day, as part of Once And For All Week on SportsRadio94WIP, which wraps up tomorrow with a Gabe Kapler debate. 

Wentz is running away with this one, as social media is not happy with the Wentz doubters

The 94WIP Midday Show hosts Joe DeCamara and former Eagle Jon Ritchie discuss the Foles-Wentz saga below. 

Joe DeCamara:

The Carson Wentz / Nick Foles thing or the Nick Foles / Carson Wentz thing involves multiple "What If" scenarios.

1. What if Chip Kelly had never traded Foles in 2014 for Sam Bradford?

2. What if Foles had actually retired when he thought about it?

3. What if Carson hadn’t gotten hurt in December of 2017 versus the Rams?

4. What if the Eagles had decided to go with Foles instead of Wentz after the 2018 season?

Incredible, juicy questions that could have changed Eagles history. We’ll never know if a healthy Carson would have out-dueled Tom Brady in the Super Bowl (maybe) nor will we ever know if the 2017 Birds could have gone wire-to-wire to win the Super Bowl with Foles, if he began the season Week 1 as the starter (probably not).

What we do know is that the Eagles won the Super Bowl, and it involved the work of two quarterbacks who each contributed mightily. Wentz had a monster regular season. In his second year with hopes high, Wentz exceeded even the highest of high hopes. He was spectacular in an MVP-caliber season. The number one seed primarily came from his brilliance. His injury at the time felt like a devastation to all Philly sports fans.

In stepped Foles. Foles’ excellence was also something to marvel at. The QB whom Chip Kelly said would be his quarterback for 999 years, only to be discarded months later, rode back into Philly under the cover of darkness as a random offseason backup signing, but played his way into the hearts of Philly sports fans forever. His performance against the Vikings in the NFC Championship Game and against the Patriots in the Super Bowl are two of the great performances by a Philly athlete in any game.

Wentz and Foles. Foles and Wentz. We should truly appreciate them both. Forever.

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Jon Ritchie:

What would 2017 have looked like had Carson Wentz stayed earthbound at the goal line in Los Angeles? What if that quirky, mid-air, scissoring knee shredding never happened— if he’d played all 16 and then stayed upright for the entire postseason?

I BELIEVE he’d have his own chunky, world championship ring that he’d actually choose to wear. That he’d have a Super Bowl MVP Trophy on his mantle after dismantling Brady and Bellichick in SB52.  

We’d never dream of doubting his deep ball, his decision-making, ball security, or his accuracy. We’d certainly never wonder if “the guys” really liked him enough, followed him. People would be talking about Wentz and mentioning the Hall of Fame. Yes, already.

I know that Super Bowl team was phenomenal. He was its best player by a large margin. I know he’s a better player than Nick Foles is; but Carson has played worse since 2017.

Wentz’s career got derailed and it’s taken him a while to fix things, for a variety of reasons.

Nick Foles is one of those reasons. Yes, that’s messed up, but it’s true.

Nick Foles played the best game an Eagle QB has ever played— in the biggest game on the planet. He also played the second-best game an Eagle QB has ever played—it was two weeks earlier in the NFC Championship game. But he totally sucked against the Raiders and Cowboys to wrap up that regular season. 

Nick Foles heats and cools. His floor is rock-bottom, get-you-cut, cause you to rethink-whether-you-really-love-football-type bad.

Carson Wentz’s struggles last season stemmed mostly from skanky wide receivers. He’s also guilty of “trying to do too much”, which has a lot to do with his unspoken mission to prove he could have won Nick’s Super Bowl.

I used to be certain Wentz would have the chance to set his doubters straight. Now, with each passing offseason of medium acquisitions by Howie Roseman, I’m growing concerned that no matter how high Carson lifts his playing ceiling, his surrounding cast may prove inadequate— thus preventing him from establishing, beyond any doubt, that his best game can be bigger and better than the greatest backup QB performance in history.